Have Questions?
We Have Answers!

Kearney, NE Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Centers

Kearney, NE has several nearby treatment choices including: 1 medicare program, 1 inpatient rehab, 4 drug rehabs that take PPO insurance like Blue Cross Blue Shield, 0 drug detox, 3 outpatient rehabs.

Get Help - Find a Rehab Center Today

Speak with a certified drug and alcohol counselor

For help finding an addiction treatment center, Call us!

All calls are 100% confidential and free

1-877-882-9275

100% Confidential Help Request

Contact us now to get immediate help: 1-877-882-9275

Clinical Review Staff

Dr. Gina M Jansheski, M.D.

Dr. Gina Jansheski, M.D.

Dr. Po-Chang Hsu, M.D., M.S.

Dr. Po-Chang Hsu, MD, MS

Renee Warmbrodt, RN, MSN, CPNP-PC

Renee Warmbrodt, RN, MSN, CPNP-PC

Alcohol and Drug Rehab Facilities Serving the Kearney, Nebraska Area:

    South Central Behavioral Services Holdrege ClinicCARF AccreditedSAMHSA

    drug treatment facility - South Central Behavioral Services NE
    701 4th Avenue
    Holdrege, NE. 68949
    308-237-5951

    South Central Behavioral Services is 25.8 miles from Kearney, NE

    Our vision is to live in communities where behavioral health is essential to well-being and stigma has been eliminated.

    Region II Human ServicesCARF AccreditedSAMHSA

    alcohol treatment program - Region II Human Services NE
    307 East 5th Street
    Lexington, NE. 68850
    308-324-6754

    Region II Human Services is 34.1 miles from Kearney, Nebraska

    Region II Human Services is the Behavioral Health Authority for 17 counties in West Central Nebraska. We are a direct provider of services and we contract with private agencies for mental health and substance abuse services. Counties we serve include: Arthur, Chase, Dawson, Dundy, Frontier, Gosper, Grant, Hayes, Hitchcock, Hooker, Keith, Lincoln, Logan, McPherson, Perkins, Red Willow, and Thomas. Our role in the provision of behavioral health services is described in Statute with the passage of LB 1083. Regions were created back in the early 1970's but LB 1083 is the most current guiding document. There are 6 Behavioral Health Regions in Nebraska. Regions are responsible for coordinating, creating, planning and delivering behavioral health services.

    Department of Health and Human Servs Hastings Regional CenterJoint Commission CertifiedSAMHSA

    alcohol treatment facility - Department of Health and Human Servs NE
    4200 West 2nd Street
    Hastings, NE. 68902
    402-462-1971

    Department of Health and Human Servs is 35.7 miles from Kearney, Nebraska

    Department of Health and Human Servs has been dedicating its services and programs to helping individuals who are struggling with alcohol and drug abuse in Kearney and its surrounding area.

    Department of Health and Human Servs provides a wide range of treatment and rehabilitation methods, including long term treatment programs, outpatient hospital programs, short term drug and alcohol rehabs, outpatient detox programs, inpatient rehab centers and more. Department of Health and Human Servs also believes that it is important that it offers tailored services to ensure that individuals get the results that they require. This is why Department of Health and Human Servs is specialized in anger management, individual psychotherapy, cognitive/behavior therapy, brief intervention approach, couple/family therapy, group therapy, among other programs.

    Department of Health and Human Servs also provides transgender or (LGBT) clients, child care for clients children, legal advocacy, seniors or older adults, social skills development, self-help groups, and provides some of the best aftercare programs - all of which have been proven to further the results its clients expect. This alcohol and drug rehab also uses treatment modalities that can help you achieve the best possible outcome.

    Department of Health and Human Servs also accepts the following types of payment - private health insurance, private pay, sliding fee scale, military insurance, state education funds, state corrections or juvenile justice funds and more.

      Commonly Asked Questions about Addiction and Treatment


      Are there racial inequities of the treatment of addictive disorders?

      Yes, racial inequities do exist in the treatment of addictive disorders, reflecting systemic disparities that pervade many aspects of healthcare. These inequities can occur across multiple dimensions, including access to treatment, quality of care, and outcomes. Here are some ways in which these inequities manifest:

      • Access to treatment: Racial and ethnic minority groups often face barriers to accessing substance use disorder treatment. These barriers can include factors like limited availability of treatment services in certain communities, lack of insurance or underinsurance, economic challenges, and lack of transportation.
      • Quality of care: Even when individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups do access treatment, they may not receive the same quality of care as their white counterparts. This could be due to factors such as a lack of culturally competent care, bias or discrimination within the healthcare system, or treatment approaches that do not adequately consider cultural or community-specific factors.
      • Treatment outcomes: Racial and ethnic disparities also exist in treatment outcomes for substance use disorders. For example, research has shown that African American and Hispanic individuals often have lower rates of successful completion of substance use disorder treatment programs compared to white individuals.
      • Criminal justice involvement: There is a disproportionately higher rate of criminal justice involvement for substance use issues among people of color, particularly among African American and Hispanic populations. This can impact access to quality treatment, as well as long-term outcomes such as employment and social reintegration.
      • Research gaps: Historically, much of the research on substance use disorders has primarily involved white participants, leading to a lack of data and understanding about the unique experiences, needs, and treatment responses of individuals from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds.

      Where can I get help for my addiction to drugs with very little money?

      If you're seeking help for your addiction to drugs and have limited financial resources, there are several options available to you. These organizations and services can provide support, counseling, and treatment at little to no cost:

      • National Helplines: Our own helpline (1-877-882-9275) or the SAMHSA National Helpline (1-800-662-HELP) provides free, confidential, 24/7 assistance in English and Spanish.
      • Local Support Groups: Many communities have support groups, such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA) or SMART Recovery, that offer peer-to-peer support and resources for individuals struggling with addiction. These meetings are typically free and can be found in various locations.
      • Non-profit and Faith-based Organizations: Some non-profit and faith-based organizations offer free or low-cost addiction treatment services, such as counseling, group therapy, and recovery programs. Contact local community centers, churches, mosques, or synagogues to inquire about available resources.
      • Sliding Scale Treatment Centers: Some addiction treatment centers offer services on a sliding scale, meaning they adjust fees based on your income level. Contact local treatment centers and inquire about their financial assistance options.
      • State-Funded Treatment Programs: Many states provide funding for addiction treatment programs that offer free or low-cost services to eligible residents. Contact your state's health department or substance abuse agency to learn more about available programs.
      • Medicaid: If you are eligible for Medicaid, it may cover substance abuse treatment services, including detoxification, counseling, and medication-assisted therapy. Check with your state's Medicaid office for more information on covered services and eligibility requirements.

      How to help someone that is detoxing from opioids?

      Helping someone detoxing from opioids is a delicate process that requires careful attention, support, and understanding. Here are some ways you can assist:

      Encourage Professional Help: Detoxing from opioids should ideally be done under the supervision of healthcare professionals. Encourage them to seek professional help, as this ensures their safety throughout the process and provides them with the best chance for successful recovery.

      Learn About Opioid Withdrawal: Understanding the process of opioid withdrawal can help you be more empathetic and supportive. Symptoms can include anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, and flu-like symptoms such as sweating and diarrhea. Also, be aware of Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS), which can present psychological symptoms like mood swings and depression for weeks or months after the initial detox period.

      Provide Emotional Support: Be patient, understanding, and supportive. Listen to them, be there for them, and reassure them that they're not alone in this process. Avoid shaming or blaming, which can increase feelings of guilt and discourage recovery efforts.

      Support Their Treatment Plan: Help them stick to their treatment plan. This could involve driving them to appointments, ensuring they take prescribed medications, or helping them manage their schedule to accommodate therapy or support group meetings.

      Promote Healthy Habits: Encourage them to eat healthily, exercise, and get enough sleep. These habits can help strengthen their physical health and resilience during detox and recovery.

      Limit Triggers: Help create an environment that minimizes triggers for drug use. This might involve clearing out substances and paraphernalia, or avoiding places or people associated with drug use.

      Join a Support Group: Consider attending a support group for friends and family members of people with substance use disorders, such as Nar-Anon. These groups can offer valuable advice, resources, and support for you as you help your loved one.

      Take Care of Yourself: Supporting someone through detox can be emotionally demanding. Make sure to take care of your own mental and physical health, too. Self-care isn't selfish´┐Ż''it's crucial for you to be able to provide sustained support to your loved one.

      National Non Profit Helpline - 1-877-882-9275
      Our National Non Profit Helpline is a 24/7, 365-day-a-year treatment referral and information service for individuals and families faced with mental and/or substance use disorders.

      All calls are strictly confidential

      Our service provides referrals to licensed treatment facilities, support groups, and community-based organizations. You don't have to struggle alone with addiction. Help is just a phone call away. Call 1-877-882-9275 now to get the help you need and deserve.

      1-877-882-9275

      Organizations We Support