Have Questions?
1-877-882-9275
We Have Answers!

Don't Know What To Do?

Call Now to speak with a Certified Treatment Assesment Counselor who will guide you every step of the way.
This is a free service • 100% Confidential
1-877-882-9275

Treatment Help Request

Contact us now to get immediate help: 1-877-882-9275

Intervention

Drug rehab and intervention go hand in hand if the addict is unwilling. An intervention is when a group of loved ones and/or a trained intervention counselor meets with the person in need of help for the purpose of breaking down their denial circuit and motivating them to immediately seek drug treatment. Often, individuals in the midst of drug addiction engage in a variety of self destructive behaviors. Although baffling to friends and family members such people generally either are not aware on a conscious level that they have a drug addiction problem, or even when they know they have a problem they may cling to the false belief that the problem will somehow go away all by itself without any outside help. When an intervention is held, a moment of clarity is created for the addict. Most people struggling with the problem of drug or alcohol addiction will accept help the very day of the intervention.

The idea behind an intervention is not new. The formal process has been in use for over 30 years. Many of us have experienced a time when others have rallied round to help us in a time of need. Examples may include childhood, the work place, or in a relationship. It was at some key point where we realized that others were there coaching us and helping us to make the right decisions. These specific moments became turning points in our lives, enabling us to see things in a different light and recognize opportunities we did not know existed before.

The Steps of Intervention

1. Stop all "rescue missions." Family members often try to protect an abuser from the results of their behavior by making excuses to others about their abuse problem and by getting them out of drug-related jams. It is important to stop all such rescue attempts immediately, so that the addict will fully experience the harmful effects of his or her use and thereby become more motivated to stop.

2. Don't enable them. Sometimes family members feel sorry for the addict or tend to avoid the abuser; let them come and go a they please. This comes across to the abuser as a reward-after all, all he or she wants is to be left alone. Be careful not to reward by paying his or her bills, bailing him or her out of jail, letting him or her stay for free, etc. This kind of reward creates out exchange and criminal behavior.

3. Time your intervention. If possible, plan to talk with the addict when he or she is straight. Choose a time when all of you are in a calm frame of mind and when you can speak privately.

4. Be specific. Tell the family member that you are concerned about his drug or alcohol abuse and want to be supportive in getting help. Back up your concern with examples of the ways in which their drug abuse has caused problems for you, including any recent incidents.

5. State the consequences. Tell the family member that until he gets help, you will carry out consequences-not to punish the him or her, but to protect yourself from the harmful effects of the abuse. These may range from refusing to be with the person when they are under the influence, to having them move out of the house. DO NOT make any threats you are not prepared to carry out. The basic intention is to make the abuser's life more uncomfortable if he or she continues using drugs than it would be for him or her to get help.

6. Find strength in numbers with the help of family members, relatives and friends to confront the abuser as a group. However,you want to choose one person to be the initial spokesperson. It will be much more effective for the others to simply be there nodding their heads, than it would be for everyone to talk at once and "gang up on him or her." Remember the idea is to make it safe for him or her to come clean and seek help.

7. Listen. If during the intervention the addict begins asking questions like; Where would I have to go? For how long? This is a sign that he is reaching for help. Support him or her. Don't wait. Once you've gotten his or her agreement, get him or her admitted immediately. Therefore, you should have a bag packed for him or her, any travel arrangements made, and prior acceptance into a program.

Note-

If possible, it is wise to employ an intervention professional. Interventions conducted by an expert have a 96% chance that the addict will enter a treatment program. If you need an intervention professional call 1-800-405-8409.

Find Top Treatment Facilities Near You

  • Detoxification
  • Inpatient / Residential
  • Private / Executive
  • Therapeutic Counseling
  • Effective Results
Call Us Today!

1-877-882-9275

Speak with a Certified Treatment Assesment Counselor who can go over all your treatment options and help you find the right treatment program that fits your needs.

drug-rehabs.org

1-877-882-9275

Discuss Treatment Options!

Our Counselors are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to discuss your treatment needs and help you find the right treatment solution.

Call Us Today!

drug-rehabs.org

1-877-882-9275