Have Questions?
1-877-882-9275
We Have Answers!

Don't Know What To Do?

Call Now to speak with a Certified Treatment Assesment Counselor who will guide you every step of the way.
This is a free service • 100% Confidential
1-877-882-9275

Treatment Help Request

Contact us now to get immediate help: 1-877-882-9275

Facts on Drug Busts

  • The international illicit drug business generates as much as $400 billion in trade annually according to the United Nations International Drug Control Program. That amounts to 8% of all international trade and is comparable to the annual turnover in textiles, according to the study.

    Source: United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention, Economic and Social Consequences of Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking (New York, NY: UNODCCP, 1998), p. 3.

  • Interdiction efforts intercept 10-15% of the heroin and 30% of the cocaine. Drug traffickers earn gross profit margins of up to 300%. At least 75% of international drug shipments would need to be intercepted to substantially reduce the profitability of drug trafficking.

    Source: Associated Press, "U.N. Estimates Drug Business Equal to 8 Percent of World Trade," (1997, June 26).

  • "The strong reduction of opium production in 2001 by 65% and the more moderate decline of opiate seizures by 23% also had an impact on the calculated interception rate. Comparing global opium production in 2001 to opiate seizures (heroin, morphine and opium re-calculated in heroin equivalents), data suggest that an amount equivalent to 48% of the 2001 opium production was seized in 2001, up from 21% in 2000 and 15% in 1999. "Such a rate of 48%, though impressive, is, however, not a realistic as the trafficking flows -- due to the existence of previously built up stocks -- clearly exceeded the amounts of opiates produced in that year. It is however not possible to provide any reliable estimates of the size of these stocks. Against this background, the calculation of a meaningful interception rate for 2001, to show the effectiveness of law enforcement, is not possible for the time being. Nonetheless, data for 2001 helps to generate some meaningful orders of magnitude of the average interception rate over the last few years. It amounted to, on average, 17% over the 1995-2001 period, and was thus clearly higher than in previous periods when it fluctuated around 10%."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), p. 57.

  • The UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimated that opium poppy production totaled "180,000 hectares (ha) in 2002 (against 222,000 ha in 2000 and 144,000 ha in 2001). The resulting opium production was estimated at about 4,500 metric tons (mt) (against 4,700 mt in 2000 and 1,600 mt in 2001)." According to UNODC, "Potential production of illicit heroin in 2002 would amount to about 450 mt. It should be noted that this figure is only indicative. There are too many uncertainties about a number of important factors to calculate a more reliable estimate."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), p. 15.

  • "Estimating the actual production of cocaine in Colombia in 2002 is not easy, because coca fields are harvested more than once in a given year and eradication activities are spread over several months. In order to arrive at a more realistic estimate for Colombia, UNODC calculated an average of the two cultivation figures recorded in November 2001 and in December 2002 by the UNODC supported national monitoring system. This average (123,400 ha) was then multiplied by the estimated yield per hectare and per harvest, and by the average number of harvests per year (4). The result amounted to 580 metric tons of potential cocaine production in Colombia for 2002. While the calculated estimate is not very accurate, it is probably closer to the actual amount produced during the calendar year than a figure derived solely from the extent of cultivation recorded at the end of the year, after an extensive eradication campaign.
    "It should be noted that, although less than in the past, some of the coca base produced in Peru is still processed into cocaine in Colombian clandestine laboratories.
    "In Peru, the estimation was relatively simpler, because the level of cultivation remained stable in 2002. The resulting potential cocaine output for that country was estimated at 160 metric tons in 2002. For Bolivia, where the new UNODC supported monitoring system was still in pilot phase last year, UNODC relied on the estimate of 60 metric tons, derived from the survey conducted by the US government in 2002.
    "Adding the three national estimates would give a tentative figure of 800 metric tons for the world's potential cocaine production in 2002. Its distribution among the three main producing countries would thus have been: Colombia 72 %, Peru 20% and Bolivia 8 %."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), p. 22.

  • "Colombia seized 84%, Peru 11% and Bolivia 5% of the cocaine that was intercepted in the region in 2001. Compared to a year earlier, the proportion fell slightly in Colombia and increased slightly in Peru and Bolivia (86% Colombia, 9% Peru, 4% Bolivia in 2000), possibly a reflection of first successes in 2001 to reduce coca production in Colombia. At the same time, the cocaine seizures in 2001 continued to be disproportionately high in Colombia. Out of the potential cocaine output of 827 tons in 2001 75% was accounted for by Colombia, 18% by Peru and 7% by Bolivia. This suggests that the cocaine interception rate among all three Andean countries was the highest in Colombia (12% in Colombia, 7% in Bolivia and 6% in Peru in 2001)."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), pp. 64-65.

  • "Despite Colombian successes in eradicating coca cultivation and intercepting cocaine, most countries of Central America, the Caribbean and North America cited Colombia as the predominant source of the cocaine found on their markets in 2001 (close to 100%). The US authorities estimate that about 90% of the cocaine which enters the USA originates or passes through Colombia. The Colombian authorities also report that the main cocaine trafficking routes continue to go from Colombia via Mexico (either via the Pacific Ocean or Central America) to the USA and/or via the Caribbean (often using go-fast boats). The final destination, in general, is the USA, though some of the cocaine is also destined for Europe. If the cocaine is transported by air, Venezuela and Brazil are common transshipment points."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), p. 66.

  • "As far as trafficking is concerned, a comparison with the interception rate of opiates in 1998 (17%), makes the interception rate of 46% reported for cocaine for the same year appear extremely high. Assuming a similar volume of seizures in 1999, the rate would be even higher (50%). For the reasons mentioned above, there are thus some doubts about the accuracy of the total potential cocaine production reported during the past few years (765 mt in 1999).
    "Based on seizures and consumption estimates, UNDCP considers that production might in fact be closer to 1,000 tons."
    (In other words, governments make lowball estimates of cocaine production in order to look good.)

    Source: United Nations International Drug Control Programme, Global Illicit Drug Trends 2000 (New York, NY: UNDCP, 2000), p. 32.

Drug Traffic

  • Thirteen truck loads of cocaine is enough to satisfy U.S. demand for one year. The United States has 19,924 kilometers of shoreline, 300 ports of entry and more than 7,500 miles of border with Mexico and Canada. Stopping drugs at the borders is like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

    Source: Frankel, G., "Federal Agencies Duplicate Efforts, Wage Costly Turf Battles," The Washington Post (June 8, 1997), p. A1; Central Intelligence Agency, World Factbook 1998, 1998.

  • One of the major problems with supply reduction efforts (source control, interdiction, and domestic enforcement) is that "suppliers simply produce for the market what they would have produced anyway, plus enough extra to cover anticipated government seizures."

    Source: Rydell, C.P. & Everingham, S.S., Controlling Cocaine, Prepared for the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the United States Army (Santa Monica, CA: Drug Policy Research Center, RAND, 1994), p. 6.

  • Colombian officials "seized a record amount of coca products in 1998 - almost 57 metric tons - and had also destroyed 185 cocaine laboratories... [However] there has not been a net reduction in processing or exporting refined cocaine from Colombia or in cocaine availability within the United States."

    Source: US General Accounting Office, Drug Control: Narcotics Threat from Colombia Continues to Grow (Washington, DC: USGPO, 1999), pp. 12, 6.

  • "For the second year in a row, the UNODC supported monitoring system reported a decline in illicit coca cultivation in Colombia. It declined by 30%, to a total of 102,000 ha in December 2002, down from 145,000 ha in November 2001. The two-year decline in Colombia comes after a continuous increase, which took illicit cultivation from less than 40,000 ha in the early 1990?s to more than 160,000 ha in 2000. The decline recorded now is attributed primarily to the large-scale eradication campaign implemented by the Colombian government, as well as to field abandonment or voluntary manual eradication by farmers facing declining coca base price or benefiting from alternative development programmes.
    "As Colombia is by far the largest source of illicit coca in the world, ahead of Peru and Bolivia, this large decline was reflected in globally aggregated coca cultivation, which decreased by 18 % from 211,000 ha in 2001 to 173,000 ha at the end of 2002.
    "According to the UNODC supported monitoring system, Peru's illicit coca cultivation remained relatively stable during the year, with 46,500 ha, against 46,200 ha in 2001 (less than 1 % increase). In Bolivia, where cultivation recorded a continuous decline between 1996 (48,100 ha) and 2000 (14,600 ha), an increase of 4,500 ha (23%) in the area under cultivation was reported last year. It followed a previous one-year increase of 5,300 ha reported in 2001. The area under coca cultivation, however, remains relatively modest (24,000 ha in 2002) and includes about 12,000 ha of coca cultivation authorized by national law for traditional uses of the coca leaf."

    Source:  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, "Global Illicit Drug Trends 2003" (United Nations: New York, NY, 2003), p. 22.

Drug War Costs

  • Despite the fact that federal spending on the drug war increased from $1.65 billion in 1982 to $17.7 billion in 1999, more than half of the students in the United States in 1999 tried an illegal drug before they graduated from high school. Additionally, every year from 1975 to 1999, at least 82% of high school seniors surveyed have said they find marijuana "fairly easy" or "very easy" to obtain. In 1999, it the number was 88.9%.

    Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy, National Drug Control Strategy: Budget Summary (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992), pp. 212-214; Office of National Drug Control Policy, The National Drug Control Strategy: 2000 Annual Report (Washington DC: US Government Printing Office, 2000), p. 94, Table 4-1; Johnston, L., Bachman, J. & O'Malley, P., Monitoring the Future: National Results on Adolescent Drug Use Overview of Key Findings 1999 (Washington, DC: NIDA, 2000), pp. 3-6, p. 48, Table 6, online version of MTF survey.

  • To achieve a one percent reduction in U.S. cocaine consumption, the United States could spend an additional $34 million on drug treatment programs, or 23 times as much -- $783 million -- on efforts to eradicate the supply at the source.

    Source: Rydell & Everingham, Controlling Cocaine (Santa Monica, CA: The RAND Corporation, 1994).

  • "Despite 2 years of extensive herbicide spraying [source country eradication], U.S. estimates show there has not been any net reduction in [Colombian] coca cultivation - net coca cultivation actually increased 50 percent."

    Source: US General Accounting Office, Drug Control: Narcotics Threat from Colombia Continues to Grow (Washington, DC: USGPO, 1999), pgs. 2.

  • In spite of US expenditures of $625 million in counter narcotics operations in Colombia between 1990 and 1998, Colombia was able to surpass Peru and Bolivia to become the world's largest coca producer. Additionally, "there has not been a net reduction in processing or exporting refined cocaine from Colombia or in cocaine availability within the United States."

    Source: US General Accounting Office, Drug Control: Narcotics Threat from Colombia Continues to Grow (Washington, DC: USGPO, 1999), pp. 3, 4, 6.

  • "... While two major groups (the Medellin and Cali cartels) dominated drug-trafficking activities during the late 1980s and early 1990s, today there are hundreds of smaller and more decentralized organizations. These groups are now capable of producing 'black cocaine' that hinders detection and are improving their transportation capabilities by manufacturing boats capable of carrying up to 2 tons of cocaine at high speeds."

    Source: US General Accounting Office, Drug Control: Narcotics Threat from Colombia Continues to Grow (Washington, DC: USGPO, 1999), pp. 4-5.

  • Black cocaine is created by a new chemical process used by drug traffickers to evade detection by drug sniffing dogs and chemical tests. The traffickers add charcoal and other chemicals to cocaine, which transforms it into a black substance that has no smell and does not react when subjected to the usual chemical tests.

    Source: US General Accounting Office, Drug Control: Narcotics Threat from Colombia Continues to Grow (Washington, DC: USGPO, 1999), p. 5.

Find Top Treatment Facilities Near You

  • Detoxification
  • Inpatient / Residential
  • Private / Executive
  • Therapeutic Counseling
  • Effective Results
Call Us Today!

1-877-882-9275

Speak with a Certified Treatment Assesment Counselor who can go over all your treatment options and help you find the right treatment program that fits your needs.

drug-rehabs.org

1-877-882-9275

Discuss Treatment Options!

Our Counselors are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to discuss your treatment needs and help you find the right treatment solution.

Call Us Today!

drug-rehabs.org

1-877-882-9275