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Arkansas



Drunk Driving State Profiles Arkansas

In 2011 there were 196 drinking and driving fatalities in Arkansas. This number represents 35% of the total fatalities in the state that year. In 2008 there were 168 alcohol-impaired motor vehicle fatalities in Arkansas. This number represents 29% of the total fatalities that year. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), "A motor vehicle crash is considered to be alcohol-related if at least one driver or non-occupant (such as a pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash is determined to have had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .01 gram per deciliter (g/dL) or higher. Thus, any fatality that occurs in an alcohol-related crash is considered an alcohol-related fatality. The term 'alcohol-related' does not indicate that a crash or fatality was caused by the presence of alcohol."

In Arkansas, if you are old enough to legally drink (21 years old) then you will be charged with DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) if you have .08% BAC (Blood Alcohol Content). For drivers younger than 21, the limit drops to .02% BAC. The BAC limit for commercial drivers is .04% and carries serious consequences, particularly if you are driving a commercial vehicle when you are arrested.

A person’s first DWI in Arkansas results in their license being suspended for six months and/or 180 days for refusing a BAC test. A second DWI within five years of the first will result in the person’s license being suspended for two years. Their third DWI within five years of previous DWI means that their license will be suspended for 30 months.

Drug Rehab and Treatment Facts Arkansas

  • In 2008, 71.7% of those in addiction treatment located in State were male.
  • 28.3% of the individuals in drug addiction treatment residing in State during 2008 were female.
  • The largest age group admitted into to drug rehab during 2008 in State was between the ages of 21-25 (15.8%).
  • The second largest age group attending drug rehabilitation in State during 2008 were between the ages of 26-30 (15.2%).
  • 73.3% of the individuals in drug treatment located in State during 2008 were Caucasian.
  • Drug Facts

    A fact about alcohol and pregnancy. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is one of the most common known causes of infant mental retardation, and is the only cause of this deformity that is preventable. Babies with classic FAS are born abnormally small and typically do not manifest normal growth as they get older. Babies with FAS may be born with small eyes, small flat cheeks, or a short or upturned nose. Moreover, the organs, especially the heart, of the babies with FAS may not develop properly.
    Driving and Drugs: The role of alcohol in traffic and other injuries is well documented, but determining the effects of other drugs, both legal and illegal, on driving is more difficult. This is true for three reasons: (1) Few drivers who are not involved in crashes volunteer to provide blood samples so their drug levels can be compared with drug levels in blood samples obtained from collision victims; (2) It is very difficult to determine how drug levels in the blood are related to the drug's actions in the brain, and it is those actions in the brain that cause impaired behavior; and (3) It can be difficult to determine how the interactions of various combinations of drugs, with or without alcohol, may contribute to impairment. One study was designed to get around the first problem. Researchers studied only drivers who had been in crashes. They divided the drivers into two groups—those who were responsible for the crash and those who were not—and studied blood samples from each. The drivers who caused crashes had higher levels of prescription drugs, such as antidepressants and tranquilizers, or over-the-counter drugs, such as antihistamines or cold medicines, in their blood than the other drivers. Other researchers examined the presence of drugs in blood specimens from 1,882 fatally injured drivers. Drugs, both illicit and prescription, were found in 18 percent of the fatalities. Marijuana was found in 6.7 percent, cocaine in 5.3 percent, tranquilizers in 2.9 percent, and amphetamines in 1.9 percent of these fatally injured drivers. Crash-responsibility rates increased significantly as the number of drugs in the driver increased. Many drug users used several drugs simultaneously, and these drivers had the highest collision rates.
    Amphetamines can produce severe systemic effects, including cardiac irregularities and gastric disturbances. Chronic use often results in insomnia, hyperactivity, irritability, and aggressive behavior. Addiction can result in psychosis or death from overexhaustion or cardiac arrest. Amphetamine-induced psychosis often mimics schizophrenia, with paranoia and hallucinations.
    Nazi leaders distributed millions of doses of methamphetamine in tablets called Pervitin to their infantry, sailors and airmen in World War II. It wasn't just the military that was amping up on the stuff -- Pervitin was sold to the German public beginning in 1938, and over-the-counter meth became quite popular. When supplies ran low on the war front, soldiers would write to their families requesting shipments of speed. In one four-month period in 1940, the German military was fed more than 35 million speed tablets. Though the pills were known to cause adverse health effects in some soldiers, it was also immediately realized that stimulants went a long way toward the Nazi dream of creating supersoldiers. As the war neared its conclusion, a request was sent from high command for a drug that would boost morale and fighting ability, and Germany's scientists responded with a pill called D-IX that contained equal parts cocaine and painkiller (5 mg of each), as well as Pervitin (3 mg). The pill was put into a testing stage, but the war ended before it reached the general military population.